What is truth? Whose version of events is correct?

Let me tell you what it means to be black and conscious in the North American academy. It means reading parts of my people’s history through the eyes of unsympathetic “historians” who carelessly dip into the past with seemingly little idea (or care for) how their history making would affect those who would come to be influenced by their words.

I want you to recognize that I'm a Proud Monkey/ You vandalized my Perception but can't take style from me/
Kendrick Lamar, The Blacker the Berry

Social media has seethed with anger over Stacey Dash’s comment on Fox’s Outnumbered that female rape victims on college campuses are simply “naughty women” who should have just stayed at home and out of trouble. But not a lot (if anything) has been said about Andrea Tantaros’ comments following Dash, which I find to be a much more problematic elaboration of the same idea. A clip of Tantaro’s position is below:

We might as well expect to grow trees from leaves as hope to build up a civilization or a manhood without taking into consideration our women and the home life made by themLet our girls feel that we expect something more of them than that they merely look pretty and appear well in society. Teach them that there is a race with special needs which they and only they can help; that the world needs and is already asking for their trained, efficient forces.

Anna Julia Cooper

I have found that in order to make a contented slave, it is necessary to make a thoughtless one. It is necessary to darken his moral and mental vision, and as far as possible, to annihilate the power of reason.
Frederick Douglass

When debating sex work there are usually one of two positions that can be taken. On the one hand, it can be argued that prostitution is a form of sexual exploitation, and should be curtailed at any cost. On the other, one could hold the position that sex work is work like any other and should be legalized and protected like any other trade. Below I offer a brief history of the “prostitution debates” and examine the question from the perspective of vulnerability ethics.